Speech Therapy via Teletherapy

Speech-Language Pathologists (Speech Therapists) refer to “speech therapy” as the treatment of issues related to:

  • The pronunciation of words in conversation
  • Speech fluency (stuttering)
  • Resonance or voice
  • Oral motor skills for feeding and speech

Speech Therapy via Teletherapy

Speech-Language Pathologists (Speech Therapists) refer to “speech therapy” as the treatment of issues related to:

  • The pronunciation of words in conversation
  • Speech fluency (stuttering)
  • Resonance or voice
  • Oral motor skills for feeding and speech

About Speech Therapy

Our goal in speech therapy is for your child to speak clearly and fluently so that he/she can communicate with confidence and be understood.  How do we do it? By first ensuring that the child is fully invested in the practice no matter the age or severity of the speech problem, through highly motivating and meaningful activities. And incorporating best practice techniques suited for the type of speech problem the child demonstrates.

Speech-Language Pathologists (Speech Therapists) refer to “speech therapy” as the treatment of issues related to:

  • The pronunciation of words in conversation
  • Speech fluency (stuttering)
  • Resonance or voice
  • Oral motor skills for feeding and speech.
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If your child is not quite talking as someone his/her age should, or your child’s speech is difficult to understand, he/she may be facing challenges related to speech sound disorders. When we evaluate a child’s speech, we want to first determine the nature of the speech disorder so that we can apply the appropriate therapy approach and technique. Applying a therapy approach without considering the nature of the problem can result in little or no progress.

The different types of speech sound disorders can be classified as either Functional (with no known cause) or Organic (due to a known developmental or acquired condition).

In the Functional category, we find the speech articulation issues related to substituting consonant sounds, such as “w” for “r”, or the distortion or omission of certain sounds. We can also find phonological issues that relate to speech errors that follow a pattern (e.g., “fronting”: consistently substituting all the “k” and “g” sounds for “t” and “d”, such as “tar” for “car” or “tey” for “key”).

The Organic category includes speech articulation issues related to motor/neurological causes such as Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) or Dysarthria. We also find structural causes, such as cleft palate/other orofacial anomalies and structural problems due to trauma/surgery, and a sensory/perceptual cause as hearing loss.

About Speech Therapy

Our goal in speech therapy is for your child to speak clearly and fluently so that he/she can communicate with confidence and be understood.  How do we do it? By first ensuring that the child is fully invested in the practice no matter the age or severity of the speech problem, through highly motivating and meaningful activities. And incorporating best practice techniques suited for the type of speech problem the child demonstrates. 

Language Therapy via Teletherapy

Speech-Language Pathologists refer to Language Therapy when addressing challenges related to the ability to express wants and needs, share ideas, and develop relationships.  Children with language delay/disorder may also experience difficulty comprehending what is being said to them.  And that can have a significant impact in the child’s social and academic life, as language comprehension is the cornerstone of communication and learning.  A child with poor language comprehension, will lag behind in the adequate use of vocabulary, the ability to construct meaningful and grammatically correct sentences, and reading skills. Another important element of language therapy is helping children’s social communication skills. Social communication (aka language pragmatics) refers to the rules of how we use language in a variety of situations, with different people and for different reasons.  It also refers to the rules of conversation and storytelling, such as knowing to take turns, staying on topic, using adequate body language and facial expression, etc. 

At Communikids Miami Speech Therapy, we help children as young as 18 months of age overcome such communication challenges by creating meaningful and motivating experiences for the child. As we know from research, language is developed through rich experiences and interactions. Children with various diagnoses such as Autism, ADHD, Cerebral Palsy, Dyslexia, Down Syndrome, etc. are likely to experience some of these language challenges. If you are concerned about your child’s language skills, set up a 30-minute free consultation so we can answer your questions. 

Are you noticing that your child may not be understanding simple commands?

Do you think that your 3-year-old child is not speaking clearly?

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